Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive disease that often develops in late adulthood and results in the destruction of memory and cognitive functions of the brain. Due to the complexity of Alzheimer’s disease, there is no existing cure. However, throughout the last decade, clinical trials attempting to establish potential therapies for Alzheimer’s disease have been promising.

Recently, researchers studied the impact of dantrolene, a muscle relaxant, on the long-term treatment of mice with one of three different mutations for Alzheimer’s found in humans. Many studies suggest that Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the disruption of Ca2+ homeostasis. Dantrolene, which is known to help reverse the deregulation of the Ca2+ levels, was shown to be neuroprotective in this study.  

Dantrolene, which is known to help reverse the deregulation of the Ca2+ levels, was shown to be neuroprotective in this study.  

Huafeng and colleagues recently published a study in which four groups of mice were fed 5 mg doses of either dantrolene or a vehicle control twice a week for a period of six months. The mice were then tested both cognitively and behaviorally, and MRIs were taken to examine brain volume and levels of amyloid, protein pieces that tend to clump together and form plaques in Alzheimer’s disease. After careful investigation, it was found that dantrolene was responsible for decreasing the level of intraneuronal amyloid, thus having a potential to prevent amyloid accumulation in neurons and stop the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s. To be conclusive, many more experiments involving increased doses of dantrolene need to be performed. However, the results of this study suggest that long-term treatment with dantrolene could potentially be a therapeutic treatment for the early Alzheimer’s disease.

After careful investigation, it was found that dantrolene was responsible for decreasing the level of intraneuronal amyloid, thus having a potential to prevent amyloid accumulation in neurons and stop the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s.


 

REFERENCES

Peng, J., Liang, G., Inan, S., Wu, Z., Joseph, D. J., Meng, Q., … & Wei, H. (2012). Dantrolene ameliorates cognitive decline and neuropathology in Alzheimer triple transgenic mice. Neuroscience letters, 516(2), 274-279.

Wu, Z., Yang, B., Liu, C., Liang, G., Liu, W., Pickup, S., … & Wei, H. (2015). Long-term Dantrolene Treatment Reduced Intraneuronal Amyloid in Aged Alzheimer Triple Transgenic Mice. Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders29(3), 184-191.

 

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