Since 2011 the World Health Organization, along with many other international health institutions, has increased their research efforts into the pressing issue of mother-to-child HIV transmission. This initiative aims to eradicate new cases of pediatric HIV by the year 2015. Mother-to child HIV transmission, the most common way a child is exposed to the virus, is the transference of HIV from a mother to her child through pregnancy, labor, delivery, or breastfeeding. Without treatment, a mother has a 14-15% likelihood to pass on the disease. However, antiretroviral treatment (ART) can reduce this to a mere 5%. This regimen includes increased HIV testing during pregnancy, prenatal medicines, and antiretroviral treatment. The program goes further by striving to prevent HIV in young women and providing adequate treatment for mothers currently living with HIV.

Mother-to child HIV transmission, the most common way a child is exposed to the virus, is the transference of HIV from a mother to her child through pregnancy, labor, delivery, or breastfeeding. Without treatment, a mother has a 14-15% likelihood to pass on the disease.

Infants living with HIV need to undergo a course of treatment in concordance with ART. The 22 priority countries, those who comprise 75% of mother-to-child HIV transmission worldwide, received these medications with a predicted reduction of 250,000 cases of pediatric HIV each year. A part of this success traces back to the information given to expectant and young mothers in addition to their ART regimen. Awareness has increased with the distribution of medication, enabling women to protect their unborn children. For example, a study in Botswana revealed that 95% of women in the study consider HIV tests for pregnant women necessary. Even though many women worldwide understand the risks of HIV, not enough are informed about the medication available. Educating more individuals with information ensures the highest possibility of success in this global challenge.


REFERENCES

Mother-to-child transmission of HIV. (2015, May 1). Retrieved November 12, 2015, from http://www.who.int/hiv/topics/mtct/en/

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV | AVERT. (2015, May 1). Retrieved November 11, 2015, from http://www.avert.org/professionals/hiv-prevention-programming/prevention-mother-child

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